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Stop the Grandparent Scam Before Money is Sent

What do you know about the grandparent scam? According to the FBI’s website, the scam has been around for a decade. Scammers are able to pull off the scam by scouring social media accounts, digging into sites that show family histories, and looking up numbers on online phone directories. With a phone number in hand, the caller reaches a grandparent and acts convincingly on the phone.

Home Care in Oakmont CA: Stopping the Grandparent Scam

Home Care in Oakmont CA: Stopping the Grandparent Scam

How Does a Grandparent Scam Work?

It starts with a phone call to the grandparent. The caller claims to be the grandson or granddaughter and acts panicked. Something has happened while they were out of town. There are calls where the supposed grandchild has been arrested for driving under the influence, gotten into an accident, was robbed, or was arrested for some reason.

The caller says they need money desperately. The money has to be wired immediately or some calls may ask for prepaid American Express, MasterCard, or Visa gift cards. Often, the calls will come in at hours when seniors are likely to be sleeping and are less likely to be thinking with a clear head.

Seniors Continue to Fall for These Scams.

While these scams are frequently mentioned in the media, seniors continue to get drawn in. The pleading voice on the other end sounds convincing enough that the senior truly believes it is his or her grandchild.

In Fox Crossing, Wisconsin, a woman believed the caller was her grandson. He’s been arrested and needed close to $10,000 in bail money. She paid it. A Washington couple lost more than $25,000 paying bail and attorney fees for the person they thought was their grandson.

A Texas grandmother fell for the scam when the scammer knew her grandson’s nickname for her and information regarding other family members. She lost $12,000 in the scam.

How to Stop the Scam.

The most important thing for your parents to know is that they cannot immediately respond. If they get the call, they should take as much information as the scammer will give out and hang up. They should call that grandchild or the grandchild’s parents at numbers they know are correct.

Once they’ve talked to the grandchild, they’ll know it’s a scam. Any information that was gathered should be sent to the police. They should also call the Agency on Aging’s Fraud Hotline at 1-855-303-9470 or fill out the online form at aging.senate.gov/fraud-hotline.

When a parent has dementia, it’s essential that they have supervision to ensure they don’t fall for a scam. Caregivers can spend time with your mom or dad and take phone calls for them. If it’s a legitimate call, the home care aide can hand the phone to your parent. If it’s a scam, the caregiver can report it.

If you or an aging loved one are considering home care in Oakmont, CA, call At Your Service Home Care.  Call today! (707) 573-1003

 

Sources:

https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/the-grandparent-scam

 

 

 

Lucy Andrews DNP, RN, MS

In 1988, after working as a clinical nurse in the University Health System at UC San Francisco, Lucy Andrews started understanding home care.

She became a discharge planner and immediately fell in love with the concept of home care and the autonomous clinical practice it affords nurses. Dr. Lucy was hooked and has been a strong supporter of home care ever since.Believing people need advocates in healthcare systems, she has championed that cause across the acute care and post-acute care setting.

Dr. Lucy has worked in every aspect of home care from Medicare Certified, DME, Infusion, Hospice and finally Private Duty/Private Pay services. She also works as a home care consultant across the country and as a legal nurse consultant for the home care industry.

Having worked in all areas of home care, Dr. Lucy has a well-rounded perspective of the challenges facing patients, families and the home care industry, and as a provider she advocates for patients through the maze of health care services. Dr. Lucy celebrated over 37 years as a nurse and patient advocate.

Dr. Lucy has a Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing from Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois.In 1994, she received her Masters of Science in Health Service Administration from St. Mary's University, Moraga, California. Dr. Lucy received her Doctor of Nursing Practice awarded in 2016, graduating with Distinction and a 4.0 GPA.

She did her doctoral work on the global dementia crisis, aging and prevention strategies for healthy living. Developed dementia and Alzheimer's disease plans for aging patients leaving the hospital setting or entering long-term care or home health and hospice environments. She also developed a specialized program for those at risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

In 1992, Dr. Lucy was designated CAHSAH Certified Home Care Administrator in the inaugural offering of this designation through the California Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH).

She is the founder and CEO of Creative Solutions Home Care Consulting Services and At Your Service Nursing & Home Care, a concierge nursing & home care agency that provides the services she believes are essential for seniors to age in place.She offers a higher level of care allowing people to be in their own homes with an emphasis on independence, safety, and quality of life.

Dr. Lucy is the Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC) and sits on the Board of Directors for California Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH).

She has served on the boards for both state and national board associations, and is currently on the following boards and committees: Board of Directors, California State Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH), 2002-present, National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC's) Private Duty Home Care Association Director, and multiple state and national home care committees.

Dr. Lucy goes to Washington, DC, several times a year to advocate for senior services and home care issues. She was past Commissioner for the Sonoma Commission on Human Rights.She is past chair of the local Senior Advocacy Services.