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Is Your Parent Getting Enough Magnesium?

Magnesium is an important mineral that is essential to nerve and muscle function, a healthy immune system, steady heartbeat, and strong bones. The recommended daily dosage of magnesium for people over the age of 51 is 320 mg for women and 420 mg for men. Unfortunately, between 70 and 80 percent of older adults don’t get enough magnesium in their diets.

Senior Care in Sebastopol CA: Getting Adequate Magnesium

Senior Care in Sebastopol CA: Getting Adequate Magnesium

Consequences of Low Magnesium.

In addition to not getting enough magnesium in their diet, older adults may be magnesium deficient because of medications they take, drinking too much alcohol, or some health conditions. When an older adult is low in magnesium, you may see the following symptoms:

  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
  • Lack of appetite.
  • Fatigue.
  • Weakness.

When the deficiency is severe, they may have:

  • Seizures.
  • Muscle cramps.
  • Numb or tingling feelings.
  • Changes in personality.
  • Abnormal heart rhythm.

Being magnesium deficient has been associated with insulin resistance, heart disease, osteoporosis, and metabolic syndrome.

Foods that Contain Magnesium.

One way to prevent magnesium deficiency in your aging relative is to ensure they eat foods that are rich in magnesium. Some foods that contain magnesium are:

  • Avocados: There is 58 mg of magnesium in a medium avocado. That’s about 15 percent of the recommended amount. In addition to magnesium, there’s also potassium, vitamin K, and B vitamins. They also contain healthy fat and fiber.
  • Some Nuts: Almonds, cashews, and Brazil nuts are good sources of magnesium. One ounce of cashews has 82 mg of magnesium. Nuts are also good for the heart and can help with weight loss since they make a filling snack.
  • Tofu: Tofu is made from soybean milk and is high in protein. 3.5 ounces of tofu contains 13 percent of the daily amount of magnesium. Tofu is very versatile and is often used by vegetarians as a replacement for meat.
  • Whole Grains: Grains like wheat, barley, and oats are good sources of magnesium as long as they are whole. Grains are used in a lot of products, but they’re often processed. Read the ingredients and look for those that actually contain whole grains.
  • Fatty Fish: Fish like salmon, halibut, and mackerel are good choices for increasing magnesium intake. Half of a salmon fillet contains 53 mg of magnesium.

 

A senior care provider can help raise your loved one’s magnesium level by preparing foods that contain magnesium. A senior care provider can also take the older adult shopping for meal ingredients. If the doctor has recommended a magnesium supplement, a senior care provider can remind them to take it, as well as other medications.

If you or an aging loved one are considering senior care in Sebastopol, CA, call At Your Service Home Care.  Call today! (707) 573-1003

 

Sources

https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2018/magnesium-benefits-fd.html?intcmp=AE-HP-TTN-R2-POS4-REALPOSS-TODAY

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/286839.php

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/10-foods-high-in-magnesium

 

Lucy Andrews DNP, RN, MS

In 1988, after working as a clinical nurse in the University Health System at UC San Francisco, Lucy Andrews started understanding home care.

She became a discharge planner and immediately fell in love with the concept of home care and the autonomous clinical practice it affords nurses. Dr. Lucy was hooked and has been a strong supporter of home care ever since.Believing people need advocates in healthcare systems, she has championed that cause across the acute care and post-acute care setting.

Dr. Lucy has worked in every aspect of home care from Medicare Certified, DME, Infusion, Hospice and finally Private Duty/Private Pay services. She also works as a home care consultant across the country and as a legal nurse consultant for the home care industry.

Having worked in all areas of home care, Dr. Lucy has a well-rounded perspective of the challenges facing patients, families and the home care industry, and as a provider she advocates for patients through the maze of health care services. Dr. Lucy celebrated over 37 years as a nurse and patient advocate.

Dr. Lucy has a Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing from Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois.In 1994, she received her Masters of Science in Health Service Administration from St. Mary's University, Moraga, California. Dr. Lucy received her Doctor of Nursing Practice awarded in 2016, graduating with Distinction and a 4.0 GPA.

She did her doctoral work on the global dementia crisis, aging and prevention strategies for healthy living. Developed dementia and Alzheimer's disease plans for aging patients leaving the hospital setting or entering long-term care or home health and hospice environments. She also developed a specialized program for those at risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

In 1992, Dr. Lucy was designated CAHSAH Certified Home Care Administrator in the inaugural offering of this designation through the California Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH).

She is the founder and CEO of Creative Solutions Home Care Consulting Services and At Your Service Nursing & Home Care, a concierge nursing & home care agency that provides the services she believes are essential for seniors to age in place.She offers a higher level of care allowing people to be in their own homes with an emphasis on independence, safety, and quality of life.

Dr. Lucy is the Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC) and sits on the Board of Directors for California Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH).

She has served on the boards for both state and national board associations, and is currently on the following boards and committees: Board of Directors, California State Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH), 2002-present, National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC's) Private Duty Home Care Association Director, and multiple state and national home care committees.

Dr. Lucy goes to Washington, DC, several times a year to advocate for senior services and home care issues. She was past Commissioner for the Sonoma Commission on Human Rights.She is past chair of the local Senior Advocacy Services.