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Dozens of Alzheimer’s Drugs Enter Final Stages of Testing

There are a lot of Alzheimer’s drugs entering the final stages of testing. Some of the medications being tested as a potential Alzheimer’s medication include S-Equol, Oxaloacetate, LY3002813, and NPT088. That’s just a handful of the current Alzheimer’s trials.

Home Care in Novato CA: Alzheimer's Medication Research

Home Care in Novato CA: Alzheimer’s Medication Research

It’s been 15 years since a new Alzheimer’s medication received FDA approval. Some pharmaceutical companies, such as Pfizer, have given up for now. Biogen has a new drug that’s just moved forward in final tests. The medication known as BAN2401 attacks the amyloid proteins believed to cause Alzheimer’s. It doesn’t stop the disease, but it significantly slows the progression.

Test Results so Far.

BAN2401 originally proved unsuccessful after a year-long trial. The trial participants were re-tested at the end of the trial, which was at 18 months, and 856 patients were seeing symptoms progress at a slower rate.

The medication works by binding to the cells that are linked to amyloid proteins. As they bind, they neutralize the damage the proteins can do. If this medication passes advanced trials and wins FDA approval, it will be used when people are diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or the mild stages of Alzheimer’s.

What Are the Current Medication Options?

Right now, there are five Alzheimer’s medications available.

  • Aricept.
  • Exelon.
  • Namenda.
  • Namzaric.
  • Razadyne.

 

Aricept stops the breakdown of acetylcholine, which is a neurotransmitter that sends messages to cells that handle gland and muscle responses and the neurons. Exelon works the same way, but it also stops the breakdown of a second neurotransmitter known as butyrylcholine. Razadyne also focuses on acetylcholine and helps get higher levels of it into the brain.

Namenda is a drug that manages how the neurotransmitter known as glutamate is processed. It helps keep the levels from reaching toxicity. Namzaric is the newest of the Alzheimer’s drugs. It’s a combination of Namenda and Aricept that helps with glutamate and acetylcholine management.

Current Medications Cannot Cure the Disease.

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s. If your parent is diagnosed, there will be a progression that may last years or decades. Every patient is different. As the symptoms increase, your parent will not be able to live independently.

Some of the things seniors with Alzheimer’s need help with are medication reminders, meals, showers/baths, grooming, toileting, dressing, and transportation. As your parent declines, you might see your mom or dad become unable to walk and talk. Caregivers become a vital part of your parent’s daily life.

Even if you decide to provide the home care your parent needs, you need help. It’s easy to burn out, so make sure you talk to us about the benefits of respite care.

If you or an aging loved one are considering home care in Novato, CA, call At Your Service Home Care.  Call today! (707) 573-1003

 

Sources:

https://www.alz.org/media/Documents/fda-approved-treatments-alzheimers-ts.pdf

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/06/biogen-alzheimer-drug-success-and-the-long-tail-of-dementia-drug-fails.html

Lucy Andrews DNP, RN, MS

In 1988, after working as a clinical nurse in the University Health System at UC San Francisco, Lucy Andrews started understanding home care.

She became a discharge planner and immediately fell in love with the concept of home care and the autonomous clinical practice it affords nurses. Dr. Lucy was hooked and has been a strong supporter of home care ever since.Believing people need advocates in healthcare systems, she has championed that cause across the acute care and post-acute care setting.

Dr. Lucy has worked in every aspect of home care from Medicare Certified, DME, Infusion, Hospice and finally Private Duty/Private Pay services. She also works as a home care consultant across the country and as a legal nurse consultant for the home care industry.

Having worked in all areas of home care, Dr. Lucy has a well-rounded perspective of the challenges facing patients, families and the home care industry, and as a provider she advocates for patients through the maze of health care services. Dr. Lucy celebrated over 37 years as a nurse and patient advocate.

Dr. Lucy has a Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing from Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois.In 1994, she received her Masters of Science in Health Service Administration from St. Mary's University, Moraga, California. Dr. Lucy received her Doctor of Nursing Practice awarded in 2016, graduating with Distinction and a 4.0 GPA.

She did her doctoral work on the global dementia crisis, aging and prevention strategies for healthy living. Developed dementia and Alzheimer's disease plans for aging patients leaving the hospital setting or entering long-term care or home health and hospice environments. She also developed a specialized program for those at risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

In 1992, Dr. Lucy was designated CAHSAH Certified Home Care Administrator in the inaugural offering of this designation through the California Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH).

She is the founder and CEO of Creative Solutions Home Care Consulting Services and At Your Service Nursing & Home Care, a concierge nursing & home care agency that provides the services she believes are essential for seniors to age in place.She offers a higher level of care allowing people to be in their own homes with an emphasis on independence, safety, and quality of life.

Dr. Lucy is the Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC) and sits on the Board of Directors for California Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH).

She has served on the boards for both state and national board associations, and is currently on the following boards and committees: Board of Directors, California State Association for Health Services at Home (CAHSAH), 2002-present, National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC's) Private Duty Home Care Association Director, and multiple state and national home care committees.

Dr. Lucy goes to Washington, DC, several times a year to advocate for senior services and home care issues. She was past Commissioner for the Sonoma Commission on Human Rights.She is past chair of the local Senior Advocacy Services.